Aviation

Aviation industry in Australia and New Zealand

The aviation industry entails any transport of goods and people via any form of the air carrier. This involves commercial and non-commercial movement from different sized airports ranging from smaller, intrastate airports to larger, international airports.

Aviation began in Australia in the early twentieth century with small scale commercial flights interstate. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the aviation industry contributed an estimated $18 billion each year to the Australian economy, with over 60 million people travelling on domestic flights each year. While this number heavily decreased due to the almost standstill of aviation traffic during 2020, 3.1 million passengers flew on a commercial domestic flight during March 2021, with this number expected to increase, dependent on state border restrictions.

Australian Aviation industry legislation

Recent changes made to the Part 139 (Aerodromes) Manual of Standards may affect your airfield or aerodrome’s certification.

Some Australian legislation that may be applicable to your business in the aviation industry may include, but may not be limited to:

  • Air Navigation Act 1920
  • Air Navigation (Aircraft Noise) Regulations 2018
  • Airports Act 1996
  • Airspace Act 2007
  • Airspace Regulations 2007
  • Aviation Transport Security Act 2004
  • Civil Aviation Act 1988
  • Civil Aviation (Carrier’s Liability) Act 1959
  • Damage by Aircraft Act 1999
  • International Air Services Commission Act 1992
  • Ownership & Control of Leased Federal Airports
  • Part 139 (Aerodromes) Manual of Standards 2019
  • The Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998
  • Emergency Management Act 2013 (VIC)
  • Emergency Management Act 2005 (WA)
  • State Emergency and Rescue Management Act 1989 (NSW)
  • Disaster Management Act 2003 (QLD)
  • Emergency Management Act 2004 (SA)
  • Emergency Management Act 2006 (TAS)
  • Emergency Management Act 2013 (NT)

New Zealand Aviation industry legislation

Some New Zealand legislation that may be applicable to your business in the aviation industry may include, but may not be limited to:

  • Airport Authorities Act 1966
  • Aviation Crimes Act 1972
  • Civil Aviation Act 1990
  • Outer Space and High-altitude Activities Act 2017

This list is not exhaustive, and there may be additional legislation that is applicable to your circumstances, particularly if your business conducts international flights.

Emergency response plan in aviation

Aviation disaster management

Due to the high-risk nature of the aviation industry, even thorough disaster management planning cannot protect airports and aerodromes from all potential risks. Natural disasters such as cyclones, bushfires and other extreme weather events can cause severe damage to airfields and can disrupt passenger and freight flights. If an aeroplane in the air encounters a hazardous weather event, it may pose a threat to the safety of all personnel on board and an emergency landing may be necessary. Aviation businesses must be prepared for the event of a disaster that is outside of their control and have procedures in place to ensure the safety of all personnel and to continue with, or return to, business activities with minimal disruptions.

Aviation Risk Management

Risk management involves identifying, evaluating, and managing risks that could potentially harm your organisation or personnel. Some risks are deemed to be acceptable due to the nature of the business but being able to effectively manage risks before an emergency event occurs can help mitigate any impacts that such an event may have on your business. Risks to the aviation industry can include oil price volatility, economic disruption, equipment faults, pilot shortages and reputational damage to an organisation.

Aviation disaster management

Aviation Business continuity plan

Due to the high-risk nature of the aviation industry, even thorough risk management planning cannot protect airports and aerodromes from all potential risks. Natural disasters such as cyclones, bushfires and other extreme weather events can cause severe damage to airfields and can disrupt passenger and freight flights. If an aeroplane in the air encounters a hazardous weather event, it may pose a threat to the safety of all personnel on board and an emergency landing may be necessary. Aviation businesses must be prepared for the event of a disaster that is outside of their control and have procedures in place to ensure the safety of all personnel and to continue with, or return to, business activities with minimal disruptions.

Aviation Crisis management

Crisis management (also known as critical incident management) is particularly important in the aviation industry. All managers and particularly senior role holders of aviation organisations must be well versed in how to effectively prepare for and manage a crisis. Do you have a critical incident management plan for your company that sets out the steps you will take if there is an event that threatens life, your business, or your reputation? How would you manage calls from next-of-kin and the media? How will you get crucial messages to your staff?

At Resilient Services we can create a new or update an existing critical incident management plan, followed by taking your leadership team through a valuable and engaging training session which will allow them to thoroughly understand their responsibilities and feel confident in their role, should the organisation be faced with a crisis.

Aviation Emergency response plan/management

Whilst not all aerodromes require an Aerodrome Emergency Plan under Part 139 (Aerodromes) Manual of Standards, all aerodromes must have documented emergency response procedures and ensure that local emergency responders are familiar with these arrangements.

We can offer tailored training exercises that prepare your team for real-life emergencies, and we can regularly review your manual or emergency plan to ensure that it remains compliant and up to date when changes are made to the legislation.

Civil Aviation Safety Regulations

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) was established to regulate aviation operations in Australia and of Australian-registered aircraft and aircrew in foreign countries. CASA reports to the Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport. CASA is responsible for issuing licenses, monitoring, and enforcing safety regulations and protecting the environment from the effects of aviation. The Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 set out all mandatory requirements concerning airworthiness, licensing, and air traffic control. Detailed technical material is found in CASA’s Manual of Standards and associated guidance is provided in Advisory Circulars.

At Resilient Services we can create a new or update an existing critical incident management plan, followed by taking your leadership team through a valuable and engaging training session which will allow them to thoroughly understand their responsibilities and feel confident in their role, should the organisation be faced with a crisis.

CASA Manual of Standards part 139

The CASA Part 139 (Aerodromes) Manual of Standards Part 139 was recently updated, with changes coming into effect in August 2020. Aerodromes are now classified as either certified or unregulated. Operators of aerodromes that were previously classified as ‘registered’, and are now deemed as ‘certified’, are required to submit an aerodrome manual and a suitable emergency response procedure for the aerodrome to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority. Otherwise, they will be at risk of losing their ‘certified’ status.

We can help you to understand how the change in regulations will affect your aerodrome. We can also create a new or update an existing aerodrome manual and develop or update the emergency response procedures in collaboration with your local first responders. All aerodromes, regardless of size or operation, are recommended to have emergency response procedures published and coordinated with local police, SES, fire brigade and ambulance services. Ensuring that the emergency services personnel know the layout of the aerodrome and its facilities and hazards is essential for the safety of all participants during an incident at or near the airfield. We can develop and facilitate an emergency exercise to allow all participants to be familiar with their roles and responsibilities in an emergency.

Enquire for services in the Aviation Industry

Fill out an enquiry form or call us on 0439 005 271 to find out more and to see how we can help your business prepare for the unknown.

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